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ProQuest is committed to empowering researchers and librarians around the world. Its innovative information content and technologies increase the productivity of students, scholars, professionals and the libraries that serve them. Through partnerships with content holders, ProQuest preserves rich, vast and varied information – whether historical archives or today’s scientific breakthroughs – and packages it with digital technologies that enhance its discovery, sharing and management. For academic, corporate, government, school and public libraries, as well as professional researchers, ProQuest provides services that enable strategic acquisition, management and discovery of information collections.

URL: https://search.proquest.com/?accountid=86170
Username: remingtonc
Password: online


ProQuest Database – How To

[Criminal Justice subjects and all subject eBook Central]

How To Access

  1. Click the ProQuest button on the library computer desktop OR go to Canvas and click the ‘Support’ icon at the bottom of the left menu, then the Learning Resource Center link at the top of the Support menu. ProQuest is the first link on the LRC page. [https://www.remingtoncollege.edu/lrc/]
  2. Login – username: remingtonc password: online
  3. Click the checkbox for ‘Full text’ under the search bar.

You can do a basic search in the search bar now.

See the Advanced Search Methods page for examples of more in depth searching methods.

After searching, it will give you some related search terms under the search box.

After searching, you can make the results specific by using the options on the left side of the screen.

To Cite

When in your search results, select the checkbox next to the article you want to cite. Click the ‘Cite’ button at the top right of the search results. (Make sure you have the correct citation format chosen.)

When in an article page, click the ‘Cite’ link in the upper right of the screen.

You can also save, print or email articles from these locations.

—Tips—

Check your spelling. The database will not correct your typos.

Use keywords, you don’t need ‘the’ ‘a’ ‘at’, or other non-subject words.

To search for an exact phrase “put it in quotes”.

Keyword Ideas: conflict | “conflict resolution”

Advanced Search Methods

Click the ‘Advanced Search’ link above the search bar.

Click the checkbox for ‘Full text’.

 

You can limit what part of the documents you’re searching by choosing from the first drop down menu.

Example: If you want to search for words in the title of a document, choose ‘Document Title – TI’.

 

If you want to limit your results to documents published within a certain time, choose an option from the ‘Publication Date’ drop down menu.

If you want to search for multiple words, you may want to use what are called Boolean operators. You can see on the Advanced Search page that there is a small drop down menu with AND OR NOT in it. Those are the Boolean operators. If you put one word in the first search box, choose AND from the drop down, and put a different word in the second search box, it will search for documents that have both words. This does not mean those words will be together, only that they will both be in the document.

If you want to do a search for ‘prison’, but do not want any results that include ‘jail’, you can put prison in the first box, choose NOT from the drop down, and put jail in the second box. You will only get results that have ‘prison’ in them, you will not get any that have ‘jail’.

If you want a document that has ‘prison’ or ‘jail’ or ‘penitentiary’, put each word in a search box (click ‘add line’ to get more boxes) and choose OR from each of the drop down menus. All of your results will have at least one of those words in it somewhere.

If you want more ideas for terms to search for, click the ‘Thesaurus’ link at the top of the Advanced Search page. You’ll get a new pop-up window. Put in a search term similar to what you want, and click Find. It will give you some related words. If you want to add some of those words to your current search, click the boxes next to whichever words you want to add. You can also click the words, and it will give you some other relevant terms.


ProQuest Database Exercise

  1. Once logged into ProQuest, do a search for the keyword coffee. Limit your results to full text on the left side menu. Find the search result Coffee: A Comprehensive Guide to the Bean, the Beverage, and the Industry. It should be number 7 on the list. Click the title, and then the ‘read online’ button. Click ‘Introduction’ on the left hand menu. Who is the Introduction written by?
  2. Coffee
  3. Rowman & Littlefield
  4. Robert W. Thurston
  5. Shawn Steiman
  6. Do a search for the keyword volcano. Choose the option ‘Scholarly Journals’ from the Source Type filter on the left side menu. Fine the article Understanding Risk Communication Gaps through E-Government Website and Twitter Hashtag Content Analyses: The Case of Indonesia’s Mt Sinabung Eruption. It should be number 6 on the results list. What journal was this article published in? (Under the title of the article in the results list, the journal should be in bold print.)
  7. The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy; Bingley
  8. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management; Berlin
  9. The Journal of Volcanos
  10. Advances in Dental Research
  11. Do a search for the keyword phrase “sunflower oil”. Don’t forget the quotation marks! Click the article In pursuit of food system integrity: the situational prevention of food fraud enterprise. It should be the third result. Click the ‘cite’ button on the ride side menu. Make sure the correct citation format has been chosen. What is the first word in the citation?
  12. Spencer
  13. Lord
  14. In
  15. Sunflower

BONUS:  Can you find an article about sunflower oil AND coffee?

Each subject-specific resource in Gale’s In Context suite uses eye-catching topic overview pages to bring together nonfiction materials in all digital formats. Users can read or watch to get the facts with articles, videos, charts, images and infographics, and more. The content within these collections is designed to support visual and auditory learning in addition to national and state curriculum standards.

URL: http://infotrac.galegroup.com/itweb/remcoll
Password: rem_rpa


Infotrac Database – How To

How To Access

  1. Click the Infotrac icon on the library computer OR go to Canvas and click the ‘Support’ icon at the bottom of the left menu, then the Learning Resource Center link at the top of the Support menu. Infotrac is the second link on the LRC page. [https://www.remingtoncollege.edu/lrc/]
  2. Username: remcoll
  3. Password: rem_rpa

Select the databases you would like to include in your search. Unsure? Just choose ‘Select All’.

Put your keywords in the search box that says “Find” at the top of the screen.

After searching, the results can be sorted using the options on the right side of the screen. FIRST, click the ‘full text’ button. After this, you can choose what kind of material you want to find (Magazines, academic articles, books, news, audio, video, etc)

You can also limit by publication date, subject, document type, or publication title.

To Cite

Single articles: When on the article page, click the ‘Citation Tools’ link in the right hand ‘Tools’ menu. Choose the correct citation style, and copy and paste the citation.

Multiple articles: Save the articles using the ‘Save’ button located under the link in your search results, or the ‘Save to My Folder’ button on the ‘Tools’ menu on the article page. Once you’ve saved as many as you want, click the ‘More’ button (3 horizontal lines) on the top of the search page, then click ‘My Folder’. Click the ‘Citation Tools’ link in the right hand ‘Tools’ menu. Choose the correct citation style, and copy and paste the citations.

—Tips—

Check your spelling. The database will not correct your typos.

Use keywords, you don’t need ‘the’ ‘a’ ‘at’, or other non-subject words.

To search for an exact phrase “put it in quotes”.

Keyword Ideas: conflict | “conflict resolution”

 

Advanced Search Methods

Boolean Search

Under the Advanced Search, you can use Boolean operators to make your search more specific. Boolean operators are the words AND OR NOT. You can put words in the advanced search boxes and put operators between them to get better results.

“oak trees” AND acorn — Return documents containing both the phrase “oak trees” and the word “acorn.”

oakwood OR “oak wood” — Return documents that spell the term either as one word or two words.

You can also choose where each word is searched for using the advanced search boxes. If you want to search for a word in the title of a document, choose Title from the drop down menu.

Subject Guide Search

In the Advanced Search section, you can click on Subject Search Guide to help you find other subject words for your topic. Put a term in the search box, and it will give you other relevant terms that you can click on to search for. Don’t forget to click the ‘full text’ button before searching.

You can also find more specific aspects of your search terms to narrow down your topic.

Topic Finder

If you’ve done a search but there are still too many results, try using the Topic Finder. On the right hand side of the results page, at the bottom of the menu you use to limit your results, click the Topic Finder link.

This tool takes the titles, subjects, and approximately the first 100 words from a subset of your top results and feeds them into an algorithm. Keywords shown in the graphics are those found most often in the text with your search term.

The topic for “Illinois” might bring up expected connections from the text like “Chicago,” along with unexpected but commonly related terms like “water,” “steel,” and the names of people who appear frequently in documents about Illinois.


Infotrac Database Exercise

  1. Once logged into Infotrac (it will say Gale Databases at the top) make sure all of the databases are selected. Do a search for the keyword almond. Choose Academic Journals from the Content Types on the right side menu. Limit your search to Full Text Documents on the right side menu. Find the article about hand cream, it is somewhere in the first ten results. What brand is the hand cream article about?
  2. Nivea
  3. Bath&Body Works
  4. Weleda
  5. Burt’s Bees
  6. Do a search for the keyword phrase “moon landing”. Don’t forget the quotation marks! Choose Videos from the Content Types on the right side menu. Click the link for ‘Apollo 11’/Anatomy of a Scene. It should be the first result. What is the first picture to show up in this video?
  7. The Earth from space
  8. A line drawing of a spacecraft
  9. An astronaut
  10. A split screen shot of a spacecraft
  11. Go to the Advanced Search button on the top menu. Choose Subject Guide Search from the options under the menu. Do a search for pencils in the search box. (It should give you an autofill option, this is fine.) Open up the subdivisions under the Pencils subject heading at the top of the page. How many articles are under the subdivision for Pencils->Decoration and finishing?
  12. 2
  13. 9
  14. 27
  15. 5

BONUS: Can you use the topic finder to do a search for the keyword fern and then choose a narrowed down subject?

 

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites. Google Scholar helps you find relevant work across the world of scholarly research.

URL:https://scholar.google.com/

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.

URL: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Google Play (previously Android Market) is a digital distribution service operated and developed by Google. It serves as the official app store for the Android operating system, allowing users to browse and download applications developed with the Android software development kit (SDK) and published through Google.

URL: https://play.google.com/store

The Barnes & Noble Nook (styled nook or NOOK) is a brand of e-readers developed by American book retailer Barnes & Noble, based on the Android platform. The original device was announced in the U.S. in October 2009, and was released the next month.

URL:  https://www.barnesandnoble.com/b/nook-books/_/N-8qa

Read Kindle books on your computer, tablet, or mobile phone with Kindle reading apps. You can download a Kindle reading app for free at

URL:  www.amazon.com/gp/kindle/kcp.

Listen to your books wherever you are with our free app—at home, in the car, at the gym. Even if you switch devices, you’ll never lose your place.

URL: https://www.audible.com